Author Topic: "The jangle sound"  (Read 20473 times)

Offline eirik

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"The jangle sound"
« on: June 17, 2007, 01:33:30 PM »
I have a 330 6-string, and wonder if/how I can get a "jangle sound" from it?
I have heard examples of the Jangle Box, but all of them come from a 12-string, I think ...
Can it do the same for a 6-string?
Or are there other (and maybe cheaper) solutions?
Eirik

Offline Björn Eriksson (admin)

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Re: "The jangle sound"
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2007, 02:12:07 PM »
What you need is a stomp box that adds compression and sustain to both 6- and 12-stringed guitars.

If you like to have a sound that recreates the one you heard back in the 60's, the JangleBox is only one of many ways to go.
However, keep in mind that the sounds from back then are created in an environment with components in the studio, things we normally don't use today.

I think you should try a couple of different compressors. They may well give you the sound you wish to have. Compressors can be tricky to "tune in" but once you have found your personal preferences they just keep on working.

There are many models to choose from. Start from Behringer (low budget) and go to DBX or other highend compression devices for a comparison. There are also amps like the Vox Valvetronix series with a built-in compressor that works good enough in many aspects. I only use this Vox onboard compression myself.


Offline eirik

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Re: "The jangle sound"
« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2007, 12:22:00 PM »
Thank you, Bjørn! I'll take your tips(s) and try the effect-boxes and the Vox in a shop with my Rick 330.
But could you reveal what kind of settings you use on the Vox, so that I can save some time in the shop?

Offline Björn Eriksson (admin)

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Re: "The jangle sound"
« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2007, 10:04:54 AM »
I use to start at a 1 o'clock position with both knobs. Then just increase/decrease to a preferred sound/effect.

Offline Peter

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Re: "The jangle sound"
« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2007, 04:14:20 PM »
These topics on jangle are some of the more fascinating subjects that arise when talking about trying to achieve the golden tonality of the 1960s.

To my way of thinking, Bjorn is exactly right when he suggests trying a number of different pedals in search of the "jangle." The "JangleBox" is but one of them.

To begin, there are amplifiers equipped with rectifier tubes that in and of themselves offer a "jangle sound" as the tones are naturally compressed. Certainly one example of this phenomenon is the Vox AC-30 with the Celestion "Bull Dog" Blue speakers. This offers a sparkling tone rich in sustain that an number of groups make good use of, The Beatles being a case in point.

Some early Fender amplifiers offered similar compression with the use of a rectifier tube, the Deluxe Reverb being one such example.  Over the course of time, however, as Bjorn mentions the compression was stepped up through the board at the recording studio. I would argue that the music of The Byrds illustrates this point and used an exaggerated compression that soon became the standard for a generation.

There are many boutique pedals offered today that both compress and sustain that I find particularly pleasing and good at doing that job. One of the most inexpensive is the Boss Compressor/Sustain Pedal which will get one very close to the Byrds tonality. I also find the product by Analogman that is called the Comprossor to be of excellent quality offering the classic compressions of Ross and the Orange Squeezer circuits or in combination if you wish. Both of these products do the job, with the latter producing more flexibility in sounds to my ear. They also work with a negative tip 9 volt adapter. I make mention of this as the Janglebox has a positive tip system and is a bit of an odd ball in that regard.
The Janglebox produces a very nice effect with the benefit of a treble boost as well. On high treble boost setting I find I can tune in radio signals which is somewhat less desirable for me.

All of these compressors will do the job, not to mention a long list of others including the Pod and Vox ToneLab units and now modeling circuits in amplifiers as well. We had come a long way in trying to attain the sound of the jangle. Long may it continue.

I read the news today, oh boy ...

Offline sloopdawg

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Re: "The jangle sound"
« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2008, 03:24:47 AM »
I use a Boss GT8 with my 360 and have a patch set up using some pitch shift in the chain and get a beautiful 12 string ring from it. Through the headphones especially, it sounds just like a twelve.


Offline Peter

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Re: "The jangle sound"
« Reply #6 on: January 23, 2008, 10:10:42 AM »
Sloopdawg: As you have found, there are many ways to get the jangle sound. Many pedals have patches, some downloadable, the allow for this sound.

It is true, that with the right effect, the sustain and jangle is easily attainable using a six string as well.

As yet, however, I have not found an effect that successfully models a 12 string sound.
I read the news today, oh boy ...

Offline sloopdawg

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Re: "The jangle sound"
« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2008, 09:28:12 PM »
Yes I totaly agree with you on that, I have noticed that only my 360 reproduces the 12 string sound accurately, the other guitars for some reason just don't sound as convincing.

Offline flyingeagle

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Re: "The jangle sound"
« Reply #8 on: February 16, 2008, 01:56:01 PM »
Howdy,

I too have tried many compression pedals including some of the boutique pedals. Lately I've been using an older MXR Dynacomp through a Fender Hotrod Deluxe and with my 620/12, it captures the jangle sound that I was looking for.

Steve

Offline sloopdawg

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Re: "The jangle sound"
« Reply #9 on: February 20, 2008, 01:36:55 AM »
Hey Steve how do you like that Hot Rod Deluxe? I have a friend who has one and it sounds awesome.  I like the 620 also, I don't have one but have been fortunate to have played one a few times, (a sweet guitar) got any pics of your baby?

Offline flyingeagle

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Re: "The jangle sound"
« Reply #10 on: February 21, 2008, 03:01:58 PM »
Hey Steve how do you like that Hot Rod Deluxe? I have a friend who has one and it sounds awesome.  I like the 620 also, I don't have one but have been fortunate to have played one a few times, (a sweet guitar) got any pics of your baby?

Howdy,

There is a pic of the 620 on this website in the gallery under my real name, Steve Strum. The Fender Deluxe is a good amp and not too heavy to lug around. A compressor pedal also adds to the jangle sound. No need to purchase an expensive one as many of the standard pedals will work just fine. The boutique pedals are great too. The best thing to do is to test them out at a music store with your guitar.

Steve

Offline Mitch Schecter

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Re: "The jangle sound"
« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2008, 03:43:26 PM »
I use a compression pedal and a chorus pedal...both made by Danelectro, with my 360/12 in the bridge position, going through a variety of different amps. And I always achieve a great "Jangle" sound.
I have heard that the Jangle Box is nice. I may try that someday.

Offline Herb

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Re: "The jangle sound"
« Reply #12 on: April 11, 2008, 12:41:38 AM »
Way back when I used to actually use my slanted fret 360-12 on band gigs in the early '70's, I just used the Ric through a '69 Twin Reverb (with JBL's) with no effects. It jangled just fine! 8) 8)
Yer guitar pickin' friend,
Herb
"It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing!"
Doghouse Jazz


buchrob

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Re: "The jangle sound"
« Reply #13 on: January 06, 2009, 01:46:42 AM »
The key to a good jangle sound is a good clean tube amp.

I own 2-330/6's, a 330/12 and a 650 Dakota and they all sound best through a Traynor YCS50 tube amp.

The jangle is a function of the natural resonance the Ric hollow body produces and the harmonics a tube amp does on its own without any special intervention.

Offline Björn Eriksson (admin)

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Re: "The jangle sound"
« Reply #14 on: January 06, 2009, 10:35:09 AM »
Welcome to the Forum, Buchrob. You seem to have found the origin of the sound. Very interesting. Have you used any other tube amps with your guitars?